Kevin Lyman’s “The New Music Biz: Bands, Brands, Managers & Tours”
Kevin Lyman, founder of Vans Warped Tour, is offering an online class on CreativeLive with insight and options for building a career in the music industry. By purchasing and downloading his class, you’ll also receive tips from special guests Andy Biersack (Black Veil Brides), Mike Kaminsky (Manager of the Summer Set and 3OH!3), Jake Round (Pure Noise Records) and bonus materials. 
For more info, view the class page “The New Music Biz: Bands, Brands, Managers & Tours” on CreativeLive.

Kevin Lyman’s “The New Music Biz: Bands, Brands, Managers & Tours”

Kevin Lyman, founder of Vans Warped Tour, is offering an online class on CreativeLive with insight and options for building a career in the music industry. By purchasing and downloading his class, you’ll also receive tips from special guests Andy Biersack (Black Veil Brides), Mike Kaminsky (Manager of the Summer Set and 3OH!3), Jake Round (Pure Noise Records) and bonus materials. 

For more info, view the class page “The New Music Biz: Bands, Brands, Managers & Tours” on CreativeLive.

Exclusive Interview with Sucré 
Edgy-pop musical outfit Sucré has just released its second installment, Loner, an EP filled with captivating beats and vocals you can’t help but belt out. We caught up with lead singer Stacy King to pick her brain about the new album, getting to work side-by-side with her husband and her love for songwriting and music-making. 
Get a taste of Sucré by listening to the sugary track “Young and Free" and read our full interview after the jump:
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1. First off, congrats on the release of your new EP, Loner! Any story behind the title?
S: I chose the title to signify my coming out as a solo artist but didn’t want to make a big grandiose statement. I am shy and the term “Loner” is more how I felt.
2. You were also in a band called Eisley previously with your siblings. What made you decide to branch out and start Sucré as a side project? And will it continue to become a more permanent focus in your music career? 
S: I never set out to make a solo record.  I was pretty surprised halfway through like, “Woah…am I really doing this?? I guess I am!” 
I just felt such a musical chemistry working with my producer Jeremy [Larson]. He and my husband work as a team on my albums. They are both equally insanely talented and Inspire me so much. I feel incredibly lucky to get to work with them.
3. Do you remember the first song you ever wrote?
S: Oh yes! I will never forget it. I was 8 yrs old and it was pretty heavy in the sense that it carried a lot of emotional weight. I was a weird kid. I was sensitive felt things very strongly.
It was about a friend of my parents who tried to commit suicide. I was so upset about it and wrote it from his perspective about being inhibited by his depression and wanting to break free. 
I know…I said I was a weird kid!
4. Do you feel different with this new EP as opposed to A Minor Bird? Did you try anything new?
S: Of course! I love the journey of trying new things. I love following my whim and keeping it fresh. I am ALL about the freshness. Haha.
5. Do you have a favorite song you’ve written off the new EP?
S: Not really. I enjoy singing all of them.
6. Where do most of your songs originate? 
S: I’m not sure to be honest! I have always just had such a need to write music. It helps me to feel at home in the world. 
7. What is it like being able to create and produce music with your husband?
S: It’s really exciting. He’s such a monster of talent and energy and he continues to inspire me throughout the process. He understands who I am as an artist and we have a great understanding with one another.
8. If you could make sure one person in the world heard your music, who would it be?
S: PAUL MCCARTNEY 
9. Have any shows coming up? We’d love to see you live! :) 
S: I just finished up my first tour and am so excited to play more shows around the country soon! Hopefully Los Angeles later this year. Would love to see you guys there:)

Exclusive Interview with Sucré 

Edgy-pop musical outfit Sucré has just released its second installment, Loner, an EP filled with captivating beats and vocals you can’t help but belt out. We caught up with lead singer Stacy King to pick her brain about the new album, getting to work side-by-side with her husband and her love for songwriting and music-making. 

Get a taste of Sucré by listening to the sugary track “Young and Free" and read our full interview after the jump:

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Jhené Aiko Talks to NPR About “Souled Out”
Jhené Aiko wrote her first rap at 7 years old and signed a record deal at 12. While navigating the ins and outs of this new musical territory over the years, Aiko has learned how important it is to express her own ideas rather than sing whatever is given to her. Enter: Aiko’s debut album “Souled Out.” 

"People don’t even expect you to write your own music nowadays," Aiko says. "They just sort of throw things at you that you’re not really about, and to me that’s disrespectful. … It’s like, how dare you send me this song that’s talking about things that I’m completely not into?"

Listen to Jhené Aiko’s full interview on NPR (and hear her recite her first rap!)

Jhené Aiko Talks to NPR About “Souled Out”

Jhené Aiko wrote her first rap at 7 years old and signed a record deal at 12. While navigating the ins and outs of this new musical territory over the years, Aiko has learned how important it is to express her own ideas rather than sing whatever is given to her. Enter: Aiko’s debut album “Souled Out.” 

"People don’t even expect you to write your own music nowadays," Aiko says. "They just sort of throw things at you that you’re not really about, and to me that’s disrespectful. … It’s like, how dare you send me this song that’s talking about things that I’m completely not into?"

Listen to Jhené Aiko’s full interview on NPR (and hear her recite her first rap!)

"Is Your Gym Class Making You Deaf?" via MailOnline
A study done by the National Acoustic Laboratories in Australia revealed that the music used in fitness classes reaches sound levels as high as a jet engine, between 93 and 94 decibels. Audiologist Janette Thorburn adds that as sound approaches 100 decibels, you might get hearing damage after only 15 minutes of exposure.  
Read on to find out more about how to prevent this type of damage next time you hit the gym. 

"Is Your Gym Class Making You Deaf?" via MailOnline

A study done by the National Acoustic Laboratories in Australia revealed that the music used in fitness classes reaches sound levels as high as a jet engine, between 93 and 94 decibels. Audiologist Janette Thorburn adds that as sound approaches 100 decibels, you might get hearing damage after only 15 minutes of exposure.  

Read on to find out more about how to prevent this type of damage next time you hit the gym

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Julian Casablancas and Karen O Interview Each Other

O: It’s hard as shit to write lyrics.Casablancas: To write good lyrics.O: Yeah, anyone who really gives it a shot.… Casablancas: It’s hard to write good lyrics that are meaningful. It’s hard to not write bad lyrics and fake it and have a meaningless thing that sounds cool. That move you on a deep level and have a deep meaning but just sound good and you can enjoy lightly.O: Lou Reed was really good at that.Casablancas: Oh, man. He’s the best. When I was probably 19, he was doing a book signing at Barnes & Noble, and we went. He was walking away; we almost missed it. So I just grabbed one of the books—I didn’t even know if I had the money to pay for it—just to stop him, you know what I mean? And he was totally weird and awesomely insane. O: “Sangria in the park,” man. Casablancas: He’s the king. 
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In a delightful interview that touches on the boy’s club mentality, the impact of the Dirty Dancing soundtrack and the lyric writing process, Karen O and Julian Casablances interview each other for Time Out! New York in what might be one of my favorite pieces of the year.

tuneage:

Julian Casablancas and Karen O Interview Each Other

O: It’s hard as shit to write lyrics.
Casablancas:
 To write good lyrics.
O:
 Yeah, anyone who really gives it a shot.… 
Casablancas:
 It’s hard to write good lyrics that are meaningful. It’s hard to not write bad lyrics and fake it and have a meaningless thing that sounds cool. That move you on a deep level and have a deep meaning but just sound good and you can enjoy lightly.
O:
 Lou Reed was really good at that.
Casablancas:
 Oh, man. He’s the best. When I was probably 19, he was doing a book signing at Barnes & Noble, and we went. He was walking away; we almost missed it. So I just grabbed one of the books—I didn’t even know if I had the money to pay for it—just to stop him, you know what I mean? And he was totally weird and awesomely insane. 
O: “Sangria in the park,” man. 
Casablancas: He’s the king. 

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